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WW1 Embossed Paper Crest 10th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers

WW1 Embossed Paper Crest 10th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers

In good condition. Circa 3cms wide.

The 10th (Reserve) Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers was formed at Lurgan, County Armagh in September 1915 from the depot companies of the 9th Battalion as a local reserve Battalion. In January 1916 it moved to Newtownards as part of the 15th (Ulster) Reserve Brigade, returning to Armagh in August 1917. In April 1918, it moved to England, based at Rugeley. May 1918 Absorbed by the 3rd Battalion.

H45

Code: 63769

6.00 GBP


WW1 Art Postcard of Zepplin shot dowm in flames, Cuffley, Nr Enfield, Middlesex on 3rd Sept 1916

WW1 Art Postcard of Zepplin shot dowm in flames, Cuffley, Nr Enfield, Middlesex on 3rd Sept 1916

Artists impression of Zeppelin being brought down in flames in the early morning of Sept 3rd 1916 at Cuffley near Enfield, and apparently drawn by an eyewitness.

Postally unused, In very good condition with extremely slight corner wear to one corner.

Code: 53002

6.00 GBP


A Tragedy at Sea - HMS Waterwitch 1903 Composite Original Photo Cabinet

A Tragedy at Sea - HMS Waterwitch 1903 Composite Original Photo Cabinet

An original photograph on card (6.5 inches by 4.25 inches) of three shipmates lost at sea in 1903. This is a very clever composite photo put together from three separate photos, no doubt at the reuqest of their crew members. It is hard to tell at first but the chances of the three of them being photographed together, given their different rates and even in the case of one who as a cap tally for HMS Wellington, is extremely remote.

Admiralty records confirm the following comment against all three of them:

"HMS Waterwitch - Drowning - while securing the gig which was breaking adrift they were carried over the side by the same sea during a gale" (ADM 104/102, 109 and 122)

From the above sources it was also gleaned that the men were:

George Alfred Russell (age 25) (who left a widow).
James Monro Henderson (age 27)
Frederick Eveligh Jerrard (age 28)

Sold with handwritten research. Some minor wear and odd foxing spot but generally in very good condition. Blank reverse.

Code: 52717

22.00 GBP


17th Light Battery, Royal Artillery which formed part of 23rd & 25th Mountain Brigade, who used 70mm Light weight Mountain Guns in India (circa 1924 to 1937) original photograph

17th Light Battery, Royal Artillery which formed part of 23rd & 25th Mountain Brigade, who used 70mm Light weight Mountain Guns in India (circa 1924 to 1937) original photograph

This is an original photograph (smaller than a normal postcard size at circa 11cm by 6.5cm) of the 17th Light Battery, Royal Artillery which formed part of 23rd & 25th Mountain Brigade, who used 70mm Light weight Mountain Guns in India. It has a one inch crease and some evidence of creasing from having been removed from album but is a rare image and the 17L is visible on the RA diamond on the sun helmet.

Code: 52490

8.00 GBP


WW1 Cigarette Silk 25th Division Messines 1917

WW1 Cigarette Silk 25th Division Messines 1917

A scarce silk commemorating the part played by the British 25th Division, showing the chequered formation sign which was for vehicle marking and also the big red horseshoe worn on the back of the battledress tunic. Not come across anything like this before. Some wear and fraying to the tails, but still ni its original protective grease proof paper envelope.

The Battle of Messines was a prelude to the Third Battle of Ypres. The Germans held the Messines Ridge, which gave them a favourable view of the surrounding terrain. The ridge had to be captured before the Ypres offensive could start. Extensive preparations were made for the attack. Messines would arguably be the best-prepared attack by the Allies on the Western Front. Three British corps were to make the attack on Messines Ridge, including the II Anzac Corps. An immense creeping barrage of artillery and machine-gun fire was designed to move ahead of the infantry.
The battle commenced just after 3am on 7th June 1917. Heralded by the intense detonation of the mines, the Allied troops made good headway up the ridge.

Coll

Code: 63707

SOLD


Scarce Original WW1 Black & White Postcard - Private Soldier 23rd Battalion ( 2nd Football Battalion  ) The Middlesex Regiment

Scarce Original WW1 Black & White Postcard - Private Soldier 23rd Battalion ( 2nd Football Battalion ) The Middlesex Regiment

Postally unused, but a message of greeting in ink to the reverse (from your Lieben (Your Love) Herbert. Smart looking soldier, taken circa 1919 (Army of Occupation), he wears BWM ribbon, with clear 23 Middlesex Shoulder Title not listed in Westlake!), and Middlesex Regiment Cap Badge. In very good condition.

The 23rd (2nd Football) Battalion, Middlesex Regiment (Duke of Cambridge's Own) was raised in London on the 29th of June 1915 by W. Joynson Hicks MP. Apart from more professional footballers, The ranks of the 23rd Middlesex, like the 17th Middlesex ( 1st Football Battalion ) who preceded them, were further swelled by numerous amateur players, officials and football fans eager to serve alongside their favourite players.

They trained at Cranleigh and in November joined 123rd Brigade, 41st Division at Aldershot. They proceeded to France in the first week of May 1916, and the division concentrated between Hazebrouck and Bailleul. In 1916 they were in action at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges on the Somme. In 1917 they fought during The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road and took part in the Operations on the Flanders coast. In November the Division was ordered to Italy, moving by train to Mantua. The Division took the front line near the River Piave, north west of Treviso. In February they were summoned back to France and departed from Campo San Piero, travelling by train to concentrate near Doullens and Mondicourt. They were in action during The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume and The Battle of Arras before moving to Flanders for The Battles of the Lys. They were in action during the Final Advance in Flanders, at Courtrai and Ooteghem. At the Armistice the advanced units were at Nederbrakel, Tenbosch and the River Dender. 41st Division was chosen to join the Army of Occupation, and on 12 January the Division took over the left section of the Cologne bridgehead. Demobilisation began; in March 1919 and the Division was renamed the London Division.

A66.1

Code: 55781

SOLD


WW1 Two Rare Preprinted Field Service India Message Postcards for use by Indian Troops at the Front - Hindi

WW1 Two Rare Preprinted Field Service India Message Postcards for use by Indian Troops at the Front - Hindi

A rare pair of two patterns, one has an army number form A.F. A2042 D (Hindi). The script to the reverse of each is pre-printed Hindi script. No doubt one of my Indian customers will provide us all with a translation! In poor condition and stained. However, not something you come across everyday, and reminds us all of the part played by India on the Western and Eastern Fronts.

Coll

Code: 61937

25.00 GBP


WW1 Original Black & White Postcard Photo of Royal Engineers in Trenchcoats

WW1 Original Black & White Postcard Photo of Royal Engineers in Trenchcoats

An original WW1 postcard, with four Royal Engineers, three wearing the Trench Coat which became popular in WW1 and the Corporal to the left in service dress. A French card, with signs of having been removed from uniform. A sharp image, badges clear, and scarce view of men in trench coats.

Coll

Code: 63706

10.00 GBP


WW1 Original Photograph of Three Royal Engineers - 'show & tell' session with a model WW1 tank and bi-plane

WW1 Original Photograph of Three Royal Engineers - 'show & tell' session with a model WW1 tank and bi-plane

A great image of boys and their toys! The soldier standing to the rear has a wooden bi-plane tucked under his arm, and the two seated at the front look like they have collaborated on the making of detailed wooden WW1 tank. I believe the sapper to the right with pipe clenched in his mouth is the same soldier as the one in the hand-tinted photograph listed below (item 61934) but cannot prove it other than they came in the same lot. Postally unused, in very good condition. Dover photographer, reverse with ink message 'with love George'.

Coll

Code: 61942

16.00 GBP


Personal Letter from an Officer of 1st Airborne, Operation Doomsday, Norway May - August 1945

Personal Letter from an Officer of 1st Airborne, Operation Doomsday, Norway May - August 1945

11 pages (double sided), neatly written, much personal stuff and family related chat but some interesting information from a man on the ground about the events in Norway following the German's surrender. The letter is to a Sunderland address in County Durham, to the mother of a Lieutenant Oswald A Robinson of the 1st Border Regiment, 1st Airborne Division, Zone 1 B.L.A. and dated 9th June 1945. The envelope carries a Field Post Office Stamp 343.

In page 2 of his letter he comments on an 'insidious little article' sent to him on 4th June entitled 'Nazis loot while Norway Starves', condemning most of the assertions in it as 'absolute tummy rot' although he does acknowledge that they were significantly out-numbered in Norway, but he was certain they could hold their own if need be until reinforcements were brought in. He states 'unfortunately' they had been told to treat the Germans with respect, mainly because the administration of all their camps, including medical services, supplies etc, remained in German hands and for the Allies to take this one would require tens of thousands more troops. He also refutes that supplies and bulky loot were being shipped out of Norway, and no German ships had been allowed to leave. The Germans were using their own reserves of food supplies and were not being supplied by either the British or Norwegians. He also refuted that the Germans had been allowed to retain their arms, claiming it as a damn right lie as he had personally supervised the disarming of several German units, and he thought this was now complete. They were, he admits, allowed a certain percentage of rifles to maintain discipline in their own camps which he considered sensible as "if 500,000 Germans started rambling all over the country then they would be much more of a menace to us than they are at present. They are allowed to retain 2 rifles per 100 men for enforcing order."

He carries on in this vein for the next 6 pages, claiming a "red beret is a passport to the friendliness and hospitality of the Norwegians." From page 8 to the concluding page 11, he reverts to family chat, but ends with enclosing a 'German SS flash'. Sadly this was no longer with the letter when acquired.

A fascinating personal account from a junior airborne officer 'on the ground' in the month after the surrender of Norway and active in Operation Doomsday.

In Operation Doomsday, the British 1st Airborne Division acted as a police and military force during the Allied occupation of Norway in May 1945, immediately after the victory in Europe during the Second World War. The division maintained law and order until the arrival of the remainder of Force 134, the occupation force. During its time in Norway, the division was tasked with supervising the surrender of the German forces in Norway, as well as preventing the sabotage of vital military and civilian facilities.
The German Instrument of Surrender was delivered on 8 May, and the 1st Airborne Division landed near Oslo and Stavanger between 9 May and 11 May. The majority of the transport aircraft carrying the division landed safely, but three planes crashed with a number of fatalities. The division encountered little of the expected German resistance. Operational duties included welcoming back King Haakon VII of Norway, looking after Allied ex-prisoners of war, arresting war criminals and supervising the clearing of minefields. The division returned to Britain at the end of August and disbanded two months later.

Comm FB

Code: 63575

SOLD