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FRENCH SHOULDER TILTING / JOUSTING SHIELD TARGE - SCARCE 19TH CENTURY ELECTROTYPE COPY OF THE 15th CENTURY ORIGINAL BY MESSRS. FRANCHI AND SONS FOR THE SOUTH KENSINGTON ( V&A ) MUSEUM

Strengthened with trellis of metal bars, and chased with animals between. The original was, at the time the copy was made, in the Musee d' Artillerie, Paris (see mark on front which denotes this collection). Height 17 inches, Width 14 inches. The metal plaque for Franchi and sons to the reverse. It was commissioned to be copied by the South Kensington Museum (now the V&A) in 1857. The public and other museums worldwide were able to order copies for their own private or public display, particularly in the United States, whose museum collections had some catching up to do with European collections of armour.

During the electrotyping process a mould was taken of the original object. In this mould a copper type pattern was electroformed. From this type pattern subsequent moulds were created in which electrotypes were formed. This dish was therefore electroformed in copper from moulds made from a type pattern which itself was electroformed in a mould of the original. The copper electrotype was then electro-gilded.

Each trellis square contains a different animal. There is some wear to the shield's thin silver coating mainly through being handled over the years, but it is a truly remarkable and beautiful peace, exactly copied in every artistic detail (including old repairs made to the original) and flowing shape.

Made from copper, this electrotype was silvered and oxidised using a technique invented by a Belgian in the 1830s. The South Kensington Museum (V&A), quickly grasped the educational potential of this new technique and employed Elkington's and Franchi & Son of Clerkenwell to take moulds of historic and modern objects in the Museum (at their own risk), create copies in a base metal and then electroplate them. These could be sold freely as reproductions, with a gold, silver or bronze finish, provided they bore the South Kensington Museum's official stamp. Franchi and Son was acquired by Elkington & Co in 1874.


Information on the exact location of the original from one of our French cousins would be most welcome.

We will provide a photocopy from the original catalogue of the collection of electrotypes available to order via the museum. published in 1870, and which lists this particular object d'art.

See additional photos of this superb piece in the listing below.


Code: 53264Price: 2600.00 GBP


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FRENCH SHOULDER TILTING / JOUSTING SHIELD TARGE Extra photos

Extra photos for item 53264 above

Code: 53263Price: On Request


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A GREAT PAIR OF CUISSES, LATE 19TH CENTURY IN THE GERMAN ‘GOTHIC’ STYLE OF CIRCA 1490

Forged accurately in steel each has a shape which follows the contours of the leg, showing the quality to follow. Strong articulation with sharp medial ridges, they feature a stop rib on the main cuisse plate embossed in form and framed with filed lines.

The poleyns are deep and well shaped with a wing in good form with small rolled edges on each surround.

Adjoining each cuisse is a hinged wrapper plate also articulated a the top in the noticeable gothic style.

They retain some of their original leather straps, in relic condition, but these add great age to a pair of legs which would sit well on display with a mannequin.

Provenance: John Woodman Higgins Armoury Sale


Code: 53262Price: 2250.00 GBP


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Extra Photos for PAIR OF CUISSES listed above, LATE 19TH CENTURY IN THE GERMAN ‘GOTHIC’ STYLE OF CIRCA 1490

See item 53262 above

Code: 53261Price: On Request


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19TH CENTURY LOWER CANNON UPPER HALF WITH FLUTING

This 'gothic' styled half of a cannon has five rounded shallow flutes in a chevron pattern centred in the piece. A step flute features before each of the ends rolled edges which are small and well formed bleeding out to nothing on either side.

As with many rolled edges they wear particularly more quickly than other areas and have a small tear in both. The surface is aged with a very similar appearance of many original well kept armours but this item is most probably of the late 19th Century.

It has a pin on one side from its enclosing method and a rivet holding a small scrap of old leather on the inside of the other side. Inside is also painted in white an inventory number '828', as this piece once graced the American John Woodman Higgins Collection. An attractive display piece.

Its longest edge is 250mm , at the wrist it measures 86 mm internally across and 116 mm at the widest point across.

Code: 53258Price:


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BLACK AND WHITE BESAGEWS WITH MATCHING CODPIECE

This matched collection of a late19th Century items comprises of pair of matched besagews together with a matching codpiece. These could either be displayed in their own right or could be suitable for finishing an extant armour which is missing these accessory parts. Several armour are known to have lost codpieces because of Victorian sensibilities and loosely attached besagews, such as these, can also easily go missing with the passage of time.

The besagews follow the typical style most often seen with a cross pattern embossed into it with a raised central cone. Its adjacent quarters are crudely painted black. Its surrounding circumference is a rolled edge with attractive and neat file marks known as roping. They each measure 12.5cm in diameter and are a matched pair.

The codpiece is formed with a central band which has a medial ridge. At its top is a pin which would mount into the tassets or fauld of the breastplate being worn at the time. While two holes at the bottom are for tying a lace through allowing a quick way to remove it as required. It has been well shaped and has a good symmetry to it and clean lines. It is curved so it goes back on its self to sit comfortably between the legs. The top pin has a diameter of 8 mm.
It is approximately 9.5 cm wide and 19 cm in length.

We ship worldwide!

Code: 53251Price: 625.00 GBP


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Miniature Gothic Armour Augsburg 1485 by the sculptor Roy Gregory retailed through Peter Dale Limited of Burlington Arcade London in the 1970s

A model armour of the superb circa 1485 mounted knight now located in the Royal Armouries, Leeds, except this knight is armed with a more impressive sword rather than a mace.

The figure is superbly accurate in the shape formed and control in the multiple flutes hammered into such small sheet. This beautifully made knight and horse, in full plate , is completed with the dragon tail modelled as part of the horses armour. The horse is a work of art in itself; well made and anatomically faithful. A fantastic centre piece and very useful for the study of armour. The figure is not articulated but does come out of its saddle and the roundels on the spurs rotate.

This is a work of art in miniature by the sculptor Roy Gregory, who was an inspiration for armour collectors and model makers alike. Each mounted figure he made, including sculpting the horse, took him about three months to craft. See photos of him attached at work. Unfortunately Roy is no longer with us, but he lives on through his work.

His knights command premium prices and retailed in limited numbers as hand crafted masterpieces through the prestigious Peter Dale Armouries of London in the 1970s.

Roy Gregory's Models are part of the permanent display at the Visitor Centre at the site of the Battle of Bosworth museum. When Prince Charles opened the newly refurbished Centre and was particularly impressed by these models. Roy was duly presented to him and was commissioned to create a special piece for Windsor Castle, a model of the Black Prince.

His armours were crafted from aluminium (cleverly avoiding the proverbial problem of rust), wood, leather, and the horses from modelling clay and attractively mounted on wooden display plinths with a plaster plaque describing each figure.

Circa 16 inches tall excluding the base, mounted on a plinth of 13 inches by 6 inches. The seated Knight figure is 11 inches tall. Scaling this at 1:12

Overseas buyers, please contact us by email for an accurate shipping quotation. UK Sterling Cheques drawn on a UK Bank or Bank transfer only on this item please.


Code: 53250Price: 3875.00 GBP


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19TH CENTURY BESAGEWS IN GERMAN STYLE OF 1470

An excellent matched pair of gothic style fluted besagews shaped like petals. A common design seen in use in Germany throughout 1450 - 1500.

Fluted evenly with great care, these besagews show true craftsmanship, straight sharp flutes radiating out across this 14cm diameter surface.

Purchased from the American John Woodman Higgins Armory Museum sale. Original metal tag. Have some age to them. We consider that they are 19th century high quality reproductions, possibly produced by the well known German armourer of that time, Ernst Schmidt. See the following URL for more details:

http://www.myarmoury.com/feature_schmidt.html

Code: 53248Price: 275.00 GBP


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SCARCE 19TH CENTURY ELECTROTYPE COPY OF THE FAMOUS LION ARMOUR 16th CENTURY ORIGINAL BY ELKINTONS FOR THE SOUTH KENSINGTON ( V&A ) MUSEUM

The lions armour is an exotic parade armour, to exalt a monarch’s heroic aspect. It is in keeping with the "Grande maniera" style, which was developed by Milanese armourers from 1530 onwards and inspired by the equipment worn by warrior heroes in Classical Antiquity. The armour from which this couter is copied was the work of Giovanni Paolo Negroli (1513 - 1569) of Milan, Italy, who excelled at making decorations in relief (repoussé and chasing) adorned with damascene (gold and silver inlay).

The original armour was made for King Francis I (1494 - 1547). The theme of the lion, king of the beasts and a symbol of manly virtues, feature on his helmet, shoulders, elbows and hands. It is believed to have been created between 1540 and 1545.

In 1806, the original armour was added to the collections of the Artillery Museum, the forerunner of the Army Museum (Les Invalides) where it can still be viewed.

This particular electrotype copy of one of the original couters of this magnificent armour is in great condition. All rivets are still present and it has a D shaped buckle to make wall mounting and display easy. Some of its thin layer of silver plating remains with the sections around, rope edging, the eye pupils and on the tip of the nose showing the underlying copper. The item has two small dents in the mouth region of the Lion underneath the nasal which could either be from some damage to this piece or merely replica damage on the original from which is this an exact copy. The final photo shows the complete armour as currently displayed in Les Invalides, Paris. On the inside is the Messrs. Elkington Mark in its original placement proving provenance.

During the electrotyping process a mould was taken of the original object. In this mould a copper type pattern was electroformed. From this type pattern subsequent moulds were created in which electrotypes were formed. This dish was therefore electroformed in copper from moulds made from a type pattern which itself was electroformed in a mould of the original. The copper electrotype was then electro-gilded.

Made from copper, this electrotype was silvered and oxidised using a technique invented by a Belgian in the 1830s. The South Kensington Museum (V&A), quickly grasped the educational potential of this new technique and employed Elkington's and Franchi & Son of Clerkenwell to take moulds of historic and modern objects in the Museum (at their own risk), create copies in a base metal and then electroplate them. These could be sold freely as reproductions, with a gold, silver or bronze finish, provided they bore the South Kensington Museum's official stamp. Franchi and Son was acquired by Elkington & Co in 1874.

We will provide a photocopy from the original catalogue of the collection of electrotypes available to order via the museum. published in 1870, and which lists this particular object d'art.

An extract from this book reads
'56.47. ITALIAN. - ARM PIECES (two), repoussee or beaten and cheased work; from the suit known as the " Armure aux Lions," said to have belonged to Francis 1. 16th century. Original in the Musee d'Artillerie, Paris. Messrs. Franchi & Son.

The couters were originally sold in pairs, but we only now have this one. It measures 10cm wide at the face of the lion expanding into 16cm at the widest part of the wing which wraps around the arm tapering to 6cm. In its 3D form it is about 24 cm by 14cm.

A scarce item and given you will never own the original, this is a good item to have in your armour collection. For display use only.



Code: 53247Price: 1250.00 GBP


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15TH CENTURY STYLE LOWER CANNON - FLUTED WITH A HINGE AND PIN CLOSING MECHANISM

This enclosed cannon is a very admirable item, with great attention to detail. Its cuff is patterned at a slight angle and with the fluting present. We date this to late 19th century based on a 1480 German original.

The armourer has subtly shaped the bulging forearm muscles into the piece. It has very well rolled edges that are filed away correctly on the under-lap of the cannon halves; where the cannons meet they line up nicely and have no unsuitably large gaps.

The halves are attached by two handmade hinges set internally and closing on the other side with a pin. The cannon still opens and closes nicely (with a delicate grasp as it is old). Centrally located on each half about 35 mm up from the lower edge is a dome headed rivet which looks like it would have held a leather strap (partially remaining under one of them) as a secondary fastening strap, positioned like those seen on Milanese cannons of the mid 15th Century.

The fluting is attractive and follows all the way around in a scalloping pattern of three flutes, which are all step flutes running parallel to one another.

One half has some holes near its tip edge where it has worn through to thin while above one of the hinges are two tears that run next to each other but the section hangs on with a good 10 mm still attached.

Deliberately aged, it has a lovely old steel patina to it. The inside is painted with an inventory number, 3084, in white paint as this piece once graced the American John Woodman Higgins Collection. An attractive display piece.

At the wrist it has a circumference of 260 mm, while the top circumference is 368 mm. Total length of 267 mm.

Provenance: Ex John Woodman Higgins museum collection


Code: 53241Price: 245.00 GBP

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